Dried Fruit

Desiccated coconuts: prices set to remain high

January 4, 2021 11:08 AM, Der AUDITOR
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MANILA. As supply chains are largely disrupted and the Philippines have been hard hit by the pandemic and three typhoons prices have risen sharply for desiccated coconuts. This situation is not expected to change anytime soon.

Limited supplies

The pandemic and three typhoons hit the Philippines hard last year. Raw material supplies are very much limited. Production is currently restricted to selected varieties. This situation has naturally driven up the market and T.M. Duché is certain that there is no chance that prices will decline anytime soon. Issue is that it will take at least six months to compensate for delays in production. Market players also report that less severly impacted producing countries have stepped up shipments in lower quality to compensate for losses. Med

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